Information

12 common plants that can be deadly for your pets

12 common plants that can be deadly for your pets

Advertising - Keep reading below La Ricina

Ricinus communis is a very common plant at home and outdoors. It is known as ricin and is one of the most poisonous plants in the world, according to the World Guiness Records ranking. If eaten, its leaves and seeds can kill humans, cats, dogs, rabbits and many other animals.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Alocasia or Elephant Ears

If your pet bites any part of this plant it could end with life-threatening symptoms such as difficulty breathing or swallowing. This indoor plant is also the fourth most exposed poisonous species for humans.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Lilies

Do not bring these typical Easter flowers to your cats. Ingesting a small amount of lilies can lead to death due to kidney failure in cats. If your cat has eaten it, look for a veterinarian urgently. It has a 100% mortality rate due to its toxicity if it is not treated before 18 hours.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Dieffenbachia

Although Dieffenbachia is rarely fatal, it can cause damage to the airways of animals and humans, swelling and preventing them from breathing. It can cause skin irritation and if it comes into contact with the eyes, cause corneal damage.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Indian licorice

Also called Grain of Prayer or Buddhist Rosary. This outdoor plant has abrina, one of the most potent toxins on the planet. Only with one of its peas can it cause death. Beware of rustic jewelry made with its seeds. They were asked to retire in 2012.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Larkspur

This species of the Delfinia genus can cause muscle tremors, respiratory paralysis, heart failure and death in cats and dogs.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Foxglove

Although its extracts are used in pharmaceutical products for patients with heart failure, the root of the plant is extremely toxic to people, cats and dogs. Only half a gram of a dry leaf or two grams of a fresh leaf can kill a human being.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Autumn crocus

Also called "naked woman" or "wild saffron". Saffron contains a toxin that causes symptoms that resemble arsenic poisoning, causing a bloody death from vomiting, bone marrow suppression, damage to multiple organs ...

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Sago Palm

A common ornamental tree in tropical climates. Sago Palm has a mortality rate of between 50 and 75% when ingested, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA). Symptoms include tarry black stools, bruises and liver failure.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

The fake acacia

The black carob plant in its entirety is harmful, but the bark and shoots are the most toxic. It is estimated that 10% of the outbreaks that have been exposed have caused death. Symptoms include nausea, depression, weakness and kidney failure.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Yew

Never play with a yew branch with your dog. A small twig in your mouth is a deadly dose. And what is worse, the symptoms are detected when it is too late.

Source: Pots Planters + More; UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine School of Veterinary Medicine; Texas A & M's "Common Poisonous Plants"

Via: Woman's Day US